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Want to Watch British TV in Australia?

flip tv

Want to watch British TV in Australia?

Flip TV offers a great value BBC package which includes BBC First, BBC Knowledge, UKTV, Cbeebies and BBC World News for just $9.95 a month.

Right now when you sign up to the BBC pack, you’ll also get access to 4 great Box Music channels completely free!

See British TV packages here

 

What’s included with Flip TV packages:

•  Integrated 7-day TV guide
•  Live Stream Football from the NSW and Victorian National Premier League
•  35+ Integrated Free to Air channels
•  10+ News and Entertainment Apps including YouTube, Euronews and the Weather Channel.

 

Who is Flip TV?

Flip TV is a leading IPTV company based and operating in Australia, delivering worldwide content via the internet direct to your TV for seamless and reliable viewing of your favourite overseas shows.

We deliver English, Bosnian, Croatian, Macedonian, Serbian, Greek, Maltese, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Chilean and South American communities with access to the world of television connecting them to their culture back home, fast and effectively.

From just $9.95 a month, with no monthly contract, Flip TV is an affordable addition to your home entertainment system.

 

How can I get Flip TV or just want to find out more?

You can sign up with Flip TV online here: https://www.fliptv.com.au/home/get-flip-tv/
or by calling our friendly sales and customer service team on 1300 354 788.

Emigrating to Australia and Flip TV
Exclusively for Emigrating to Australia readers, you’ll receive a special offer of 2 MONTHS FREE subscription.

Simply quote the promo code: Poms in Oz during sign up online or on the phone.

Higher Uni costs for Australian Permanent Residents

From January 1 2018 most permanent residents & New Zealanders will no longer be eligible for subsidised places at University, meaning they will pay about three or four times more for their degrees, on average.

To compensate, the government will now allow those groups to access the Higher Education Loan Program, meaning they can defer their fees and pay back the loan once they start earning regular income.

Universities, researchers and even New Zealand Prime Minister Bill English reacted negatively to the plan, with Mr English bluntly warning Canberra on Tuesday: “We’re pretty unhappy about it.”

But Education Minister Simon Birmingham argued the changes will encourage about 60,000 new students to study in Australia because they will no longer have to pay fees upfront.

“Access to student loans could attract some new students for whom upfront payment was a disincentive to study, leading to an estimated 60,000 additional [full-time students],” the government contended in a policy paper.

It did not stipulate the time period for the 60,000 extra students, nor how the number was modelled, and the minister’s office did not answer questions before deadline on Tuesday.

Recent visa changes also mean permanent residents must wait four years to become an Australian citizen, meaning they could be liable for full fees for the duration of their degree.

About 20,000 permanent residents and NZ citizens are currently enrolled in Australian universities, according to government estimates. They will be unaffected by the changes, which apply to people beginning their courses after January 1 next year.

Representatives from the tertiary sector attended urgent briefings on Tuesday and reserved judgment about the changes, although one observer noted “a few wry smiles” when government representatives suggested a potential deluge of New Zealanders.

Henry Sherrell, researcher at the Crawford School of Public Policy, was sceptical that potential students would flock to Australia the way the government anticipated.

While students did not typically react to big movements in degree fees, “that is not the case when you have very specific settings for certain groups of people”, he said.

Higher prices “will be a disincentive, even if it is an income-contingent loan, even if it does go through HECS,” Mr Sherrell said.

Category: Finance  Leave a Comment
Businesses to be charged yearly Foreign Worker Levy

As expected, the federal govt used yesterday’s budget to outline its plans to abolish the 457 visa and replace the scheme with short and medium-term streams.

Application fees for the short-term, two year visas will increase by $90 to $1150, while four-year visa applications will cost $2400 apiece.

In addition to this, companies will also be charged annual foreign worker levies.

Under the existing scheme, employers have contributed one of two per cent of their payroll to training if they employed foreign workers.

But as the requirements have proved almost impossible to police the govt is taking a different route.

From March 2018, businesses that employ foreign workers on certain skilled visas will be required to pay money into a “Skilling Australians” fund.

Companies turning over less than $10 million per year must make an upfront payment of $1200 (per visa, per year) for each employee on a temporary visa.

They must also make a one-off payment of $3000 for each staffer sponsored for a permanent skilled worker visas.

Businesses with turnovers above $10 million will be required to make up front payments of $1800 for each worker on temporary visas and $5000 one-off levies for those on permanent skilled visas.

The levy is expected to rake in $1.2 billion over the next four years, which will be funnelled into a new Commonwealth-State skills fund.

“States and territories will only be able to draw on this fund when they deliver on their commitments to train new apprentices,” Mr Morrison said in his budget speech.

Moving to Adelaide?


Are you considering a move to Adelaide, South Australia or maybe you’re already part way through the migration journey or are an expat now living down under in the Festival State? If so, why noy join our Adelaide migration and expat social network – https://www.pomsinadelaide.com
The website has been online since 2006 and has helped thousands of members make the move. Free help and support is always on hand (often from registered migration agents) to help you with the Visa Process and make your dream of moving down under a reality. Get your questions answered on where’s the best place to live, which are the best schools, what’s the job situation like, how do I exchange money? In fact ask anything at all, out members will be happy to help.